Residential Programs for Boys

There are powers inside of you which, if you could discover and use, would make of you everything you ever dreamed or imagined you could become. - Orison Swett Marsden

Residential Programs for Boys

J Bar J Boys Ranch

J Bar J is a denoted “Best Practices” Program which has utilized “evidence based” practices for over 20 years and was a pioneer in the Cognitive Behavioral Treatment approach in Oregon. Our ABCR (Accountability Based Cognitive Restructuring) Program teaches a simple truth, “freedom and responsibility go hand and hand”.

We teach students how to understand the origins of their self-defeating behaviors and provide mechanisms and structure to help them view the world and their place in it rationally. We help extinguish negative behavioral patterns and replace them with responsible behaviors which enhance self-efficacy.

Cherry Gulch

As a therapeutic boarding school, Cherry Gulch strives to entwine the most effective therapeutic strategies into our student’s daily life. Services include, but are not limited to, individual, group, and family psychotherapy, equine therapy, outdoor-based experiential therapy, bibliotherapy, art therapy, music therapy, play therapy,and a culture of positive peers.

Treatment team is led by a Licensed Clinical Psychologist and each of our therapists are licensed masters or doctorate level therapists. A Board Certified Child & Adolescent Psychiatrist visits campus twice a month. The primary interventions employed with troubled boys are those that are empirically-based and have been demonstrated to be effective either through scientific research and or clinical experience. An eclectic approach to treatment is taken based on the needs of the individual student. However, cognitive-behavioral, family-systems therapy, interpersonal therapy, existential therapy, Rogerian therapy, and positive psychology are the most common interventions employed at Cherry Gulch. Many of the activities that students participate in have a therapeutic purpose yet this fact is generally not apparent to the student.